Monthly Archives: October 2012

October Email Newsletter

Happy Halloween from the Movéo Team!

Halloween at Movéo

Halloween at Movéo would not be complete without your favourite health professionals dressed in 1980s workout gear! Jane Fonda eat your heart out!

It’s been a busy month at Movéo, but we wanted to take the time today to say Happy Halloween! During the last month at Movéo we’ve hosted Canadian Olympians, added a new staff member, treated lots of patients, and still managed to squeeze in a few fun events such as the Hallow’s Eve and Strachan Hartley Legacy Foundation trail races.

This month’s newsletter includes an introduction to our newest team member Susan Gardiner, an article from Susan on how to protect your body through correct posture, and some events to look out for in the next month. We’re also launching an exciting competition on Facebook in which you could win the Ultimate Recovery Gift Pack. Read on to find out how to win!


“Like” Movéo on Facebook to Win the Ultimate Recovery Gift Pack

During November we’re promoting our Facebook page as the best place to get the latest news on all that’s happening at Movéo. Each week we post links to interesting articles and videos on health and wellness on our page, and photos of the team as we attend events. We want to grow our Facebook community to help spread the word about Movéo, share tips and advice, and promote health and sport events on the North Shore.

We are holding a prize draw on November 30th to win the Ultimate Recovery Gift Pack. The pack contains a Foam Roller, Compression Socks, Traumeel and a Movéo T Shirt. To enter simply Like our Facebook Page by November 29th. Please help us spread the word! We’ll announce the winner in our December newsletter.


Meet our newest team member: Physiotherapist Susan Gardiner

Sue GardinerSusan graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology in 2009 and a Master’s degree in Physical Therapy in 2012. Since graduation she has obtained her Level One Diploma of Advanced Orthopaedic Manual and Manipulative Therapy. Susan enjoys treating clients of all ages, backgrounds and activity levels and prioritizes the development of treatment plans that are individualized to each client’s needs. Susan’s treatment philosophy integrates manual therapy techniques, soft tissue release, muscle strengthening and education.

Growing up on the North Shore, Susan began swimming competitively with the Cruisers Swim Club at the age of 6. Soon after, she discovered her passion for the sport of water polo which led her to an 11 year career on the Senior Women’s National Water Polo Team. Career highlights include the 2000 and 2004 Olympic Games, five World Aquatic Championships, two Commonwealth Games, and six National Championship titles. Susan remains actively involved in the water polo community by organizing development camps for young girls to pass on her knowledge and expertise.

Susan is a certified NCCP level 1 coach in both swimming and water polo and is currently an assistant coach with the Pacific Storm Water Polo Club. For the past five years Susan has also volunteered with the North Shore Special Olympics swim team and her hobbies include jogging, photography and yoga.


Posture: A base for health and wellness, by Susan Gardiner

Correct sitting, standing, and sleeping posture is an incredibly important element for exceptional health. Every aspect of movement and body function is improved drastically by starting with a good base. Read on for why you should care about your posture and things you can do to improve it.

Why should you care about your posture?

Poor posture can have a major impact on your long-term health in both well known and surprising ways! Over time poor posture can lead to lower back, shoulder and neck pain, sore knees, muscle imbalances, and an increased risk of injury.

Proper posture ensures good circulation and respiration while decreasing stress on joints, ligament wear, and muscle fatigue. Correct posture is equally as important during sporting activities. Using poor technique while exercising can hamper muscle performance and efficiency. The bottom line: our bodies perform best and move most efficiently when aligned properly!

Where does poor posture come from?

Poor posture generally comes from adopting bad habits in everyday activities such as: sleeping with inappropriate pillows, sitting in office chairs with inadequate support, working on a laptop computer, or standing for extended periods of time. Over time our bodies adjust to these postures and it becomes hard for our body to tell what normal alignment is!

What can I do about it?

The good news is that with some relatively easy changes poor posture can be improved! Firstly, come in to the clinic and have a postural assessment done. The practitioner at Movéo will analyze your posture in sitting, standing, and lying in order to evaluate where your misalignments originate from. Then an individualized strengthening program can be designed to help improve muscles balance and increase body awareness. Joint pain and structural alignment can also be addressed. Your practitioner can give you some suggestions regarding your home and work environment to address other contributing factors.

A few helpful Posture tips

Here are some helpful tips that can help you improve the situation:

  • Try to avoid staying in the same position. Muscles fatigue quickly, leading to slouching and the adaptation of awkward positions. Aim to get up from your chair every 20 to 30 minutes to give those muscles and joints a break during the day.
  • Wear proper shoes! Shoes are very important when it comes to posture regardless of whether you have a sedentary or a more active job. Supportive shoes with proper soles are a must!
  • Customize your work space to suit your body. Take the time to adjust your chair so that the back of your legs are supported, the natural curvature of your lower back is supported and your feet rest comfortably on the floor. Adjust the arm rests to ensure that your shoulders are relaxed, your elbows supported at 90 degrees and your wrists are in neutral. Your computer monitor should be roughly one arm length away from your body and make sure the top level of text on your monitor is at eye level.
  • Avoid unbalanced positions such as excessive tilting of the head, crossed legs while sitting, leaning to one side while standing and carrying heavy bags on one shoulder. Being over loaded on one side of the body causes muscle fatigue and places stress on the adjacent joints.
  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach. When sleeping lie on your side place a pillow between your legs for support. If you sleep on your back, choose a pillow that allows your head to remain in line with your spine. Also, remember that pillows flatten out and lose their support over time, don’t be afraid to buy a new one.

Read the full article on our website.


3 Links We Like!

For our tip this month we’re sharing 3 links that we noticed in the last month that we like.

  1. Chiropractor Jamie Howard talks about how Graston Technique can reduce scarring after surgery. Jamie says “[Graston Technique] increases your body temperature, brings cells to the area, brings blood flow, so it helps initiate a new healing process”. Dr. Jenn Turner, Dr. Sarah Jung and Dr. Lindsay Rite are all Graston Certified providers. Click here to watch the video to get an idea of what they do!
  2. Lazy Girl Running reviews SpiderTech Kinesiology Tape. Kinesiology tape is used to “provide pain relief, reduce swelling, assist a range of movement and give structural support”. We frequently use it with Movéo patients to support their bodies as they heal. Lazy Girl’s blog is a fun read!
  3. Foam Roller Techniques App for iPhone and iPad. “Dr. Ryan Emmons has brought his popular Roll Release® foam roller techniques to your iPhone and iPad. In 100 videos Dr. Emmons himself shows you the most effective way to use your roller. Rolling is a highly effective, proven method for releasing muscles for people of all skill and fitness levels.” We strongly encourage our patients to use foam rolling to support recovery. This app looks like a great asset to your recovery tool box!

Upcoming Events at Movéo and in the Community

De-mystifying Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture with Dr. Kim Graham.

De-mystifying TCM and Acupuncture with Dr. Kim GrahamA ‘real’ talk aimed to help de-mystify the theories and practices of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and acupuncture. Join Dr. Kim for this interactive morning session fuelled with complementary caffeine and information about one of medicine’s most ancient practices. Have all of your questions answered, and learn about how TCM and acupuncture can help you achieve and maintain better health.

  • Special Promotion: As a bonus to you for attending, Dr. Kim is offering a discount of 10% when booking your first appointment/consultation!
  • Space is limited, so be sure to call and reserve your spot today.
  • When: Saturday November 3, 2012 @ 10:00am
  • Where: Movéo Sport & Rehabilitation Centre

Call our office today at 604.984.8731 to book your FREE spot!

For One of Our Brothers Fundraiser Event

Delta Fire Department are holding an event on Friday evening, November 2nd, as a fundraiser for one their families. Jennifer is a wife to Delta Firefighter Mike, mother of two young children, and Rehabilitation Assistant at LMH. Her busy life has suddenly been put on hold. Jennifer began feeling severe pain and loss of sensation and motor control earlier in the summer. She was admitted to LMH, and quickly moved to the spine unit at VGH, where it was discovered that she had a Spinal Cavernoma hemorrhage, a bleed in the spinal cord due to a malformation of blood vessels. Jen is now paraplegic.

Delta Fire Department invite you to join them for a fundraising evening at the Shady Island Pub in Richmond on Friday evening from 5pm – 11pm. Tickets for the event are available through the fire hall, or at the Shady Island Pub. Full details for the event are on their Facebook page.

When: Friday November 2nd, 5 – 11pm
Where:  Shady Island Pub, Richmond

North Vancouver Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards

Dr. Jenn Turner has been selected as a finalist in the 2012 NVCC Business Excellence Awards. We are very excited that Movéo is being recognized as a leading business in North Vancouver. We’ll keep you posted on the results!

AC Campobasso vs Westside FC

Movéo is proud to sponsor AC Campobasso soccer team. AC Campobasso is the flagship team for the NVFC Campobasso soccer club. Started back in 2009 bearing the club’s name, the team has risen from the depths of Division 3 in the VMSL, and is now competing in Division 1 as reigning BC Soccer Provincial Champions.

AC Campobasso play Westside FC on Sunday November 4th, 2012 at 2:00 PM. Visit their website for more information.

The Phantom Run Trail Race Presented by Mountain Madness

Join Mountain Madness for a relaxed and fun winter race through the lower reaches of the North Shore undulating trails near Seymour River. Technical and non-technical trails, some steep descents. After the race, feast on hot minestrone soup, and other potluck delights!
When: Saturday November 17th, race start times from 8:30am.
Where: Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve
Visit the Mountain Madness website for full details.

Roll, Recover, Regenerate Workshop with Ceilidh Bech

Learn Myofascial Release Techniques With Ceilidh BeckThe off season for running, paddling, triathlon and many other sports is the BEST time to get your body back in order and ready to train for the next season! Join the experts at Movéo and Coach Ceilidh Beck in this 1.5hr recovery session where you will learn comprehensive information about in-depth myofascial releasing techniques complemented with mobility exercises.

Don’t miss out on this excellent session and give your body the best start to its off-season recovery.

  • Date: Saturday, November 24th, 2012
  • Time: 9:30am – 11:00am
  • Max Participants: 10-12, space is limited!
  • Cost: $45, includes participant handouts.

Posture: A base for health and wellness

Susan Gardiner BSc., MPT

Correct sitting, standing, and sleeping posture is an incredibly important element for exceptional health. Every aspect of movement and body function is improved drastically by starting with a good base. Read on for why you should care about your posture and things you can do to improve it.

Why should you care about your posture?

Poor posture can have a major impact on your long-term health in both well known and surprising ways!Over time poor posture can lead to lower back, shoulder and neck pain, sore knees, muscle imbalances, and an increased risk of injury.

Proper posture ensures good circulation and respiration while decreasing stress on joints, ligament wear, and muscle fatigue. Correct posture is equally as important during sporting activities. Using poor technique while exercising can hamper muscle performance and efficiency. The bottom line: our bodies perform best and move most efficiently when aligned properly!

Where does poor posture come from?

Poor posture generally comes from adopting bad habits in everyday activities such as: sleeping with inappropriate pillows, sitting in office chairs with inadequate support, working on a laptop computer, or standing for extended periods of time. Over time our bodies adjust to these postures and it becomes hard for our body to tell what normal alignment is!

What can I do about it?

The good news is that with some relatively easy changes poor posture can be improved! Firstly, come in to the clinic and have a postural assessment done. The practitioner at Movéo will analyze your posture in sitting, standing, and lying in order to evaluate where your misalignments originate from. Then an individualized strengthening program can be designed to help improve muscles balance and increase body awareness. Joint pain and structural alignment can also be addressed. Your practitioner can give you some suggestions regarding your home and work environment to address other contributing factors.

A few helpful Posture tips

Here are some helpful tips that can help you improve the situation:

  • Try to avoid staying in the same position. Muscles fatigue quickly, leading to slouching and the adaptation of awkward positions. Aim to get up from your chair every 20 to 30 minutes to give those muscles and joints a break during the day.
  • Wear proper shoes! Shoes are very important when it comes to posture regardless of whether you have a sedentary or a more active job. Supportive shoes with proper soles are a must!
  • Customize your work space to suit your body. Take the time to adjust your chair so that the back of your legs are supported, the natural curvature of your lower back is supported and your feet rest comfortably on the floor. Adjust the arm rests to ensure that your shoulders are relaxed, your elbows supported at 90 degrees and your wrists are in neutral. Your computer monitor should be roughly one arm length away from your body and make sure the top level of text on your monitor is at eye level.
  • Avoid unbalanced positions such as excessive tilting of the head, crossed legs while sitting, leaning to one side while standing and carrying heavy bags on one shoulder. Being over loaded on one side of the body causes muscle fatigue and places stress on the adjacent joints.
  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach. When sleeping lie on your side place a pillow between your legs for support. If you sleep on your back, choose a pillow that allows your head to remain in line with your spine. Also, remember that pillows flatten out and lose their support over time, don’t be afraid to buy a new one.

Sources:

Brukner, P. & Khan, K. (2009) Clinical Sports Medicine. Sydney, Australia. McGraw Hill.

Kisner, C. & Colby, L. (2007) Therapeutic Exercise: Foundations and Techniques. Philadelphia, PA. F.A. Davis Company.

Nordin, M., Pope, M. H., & Andersson, G. (2007) Musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace: principles and practice. pp. 87. Philadelphia, PA. Mosby Elsevier.

 

Learn Myofascial Release Techniques with Ceilidh Beck at Moveo

The off season for running, paddling, triathlon and many other sports is the BEST time to get your body back in order and ready to train for the next season! Join the experts at MOVEO and Coach Ceilidh Beck in this 1.5hr recovery session where you will learn comprehensive information about in-depth myofascial releasing techniques complemented with mobility exercises.

Myofascial release “rolling” has been growing in popularity, but few people know what’s right for their body. Rolling is a speedy way to recover, gain flexibility in stubborn muscles, and improve aerobic capacity – that’s right, it improves aerobic endurance.

Don’t miss out on this excellent session and give your body the best start to its off-season recovery.

  • Date: Saturday, November 24, 2012
  • Time: 9:30am – 11:00am
  • Max Participants: 10-12, space is limited!
  • Cost: $45, includes participant handouts.

Call our office now on 604.984.8734 to book your spot – this will sell out!

Learn Myofascial Release Techniques With Ceilidh Beck

 

 

I Am a Chiropractor

This is a brilliant blog post written by a colleague and school mate of all THREE of the chiropractors working at Movéo Sport & Rehabilitation Centre. Chiropractic can be a controversial form of treatment at times, mostly because people don’t know what to expect. There are many different types of chiropractors out there and this blog is a great description of the experience you will receive at MOVEO. We hope that this gives a little clarity on what CHIROPRACTIC is about at MOVEO.

I am a chiropractor.  But my definition of what a chiropractor is might be different than yours.  Is that because of the broad range of chiropractors out there?  Is that because of the assumptions and misnomers surrounding chiropractic?  Is that because of the way that I practice chiropractic?  Maybe it’s all of the above…

I am a chiropractor.  This is what I do:

I do treat pain related to the spine, pelvis, nervous system, and joints of the body.  I do not only treat back pain and neck pain.  I use rehabilitation exercises, Active Release, acupuncture, Graston, and adjustments.  I am a chiropractor who rolls around on the ground to demonstrate exercises.  I am a chiropractor who watches you run if it hurts when you run, and who watches you throw if it hurts when you throw.

I do believe that the adjustment is a powerful tool, but it’s one of many and it’s not always appropriate.  I do not only use adjustments when treating an injury.  I am a chiropractor who believes that less-invasive is better than more-invasive.  I am a chiropractor who pays attention to research.  I am a chiropractor who pays attention to my patients.  I am evidence-based.  I am holistic.

I do enjoy working with those who want to heal quickly and are willing to be an active participant in their care.  I do not only treat sports injuries and athletes.   I am a chiropractor who makes you work.  I am a chiropractor who doesn’t want to see you week after week for months.

I do believe that chiropractic can benefit children, and both my babies had their first chiropractic treatment when they were a few days old.  I do not only believe that chiropractic can benefit adults.  I am a chiropractor who thinks that we should get our bodies checked like we get our teeth checked.  I am a chiropractor who has been called a ‘body mechanic’.  I am a chiropractor who thinks anatomy is fascinating.

I do agree that many patients can benefit from wellness/maintenance care, but this is not the case for everyone.  I do not agree that ‘once you see a chiropractor once, you have to keep going’.  I am a chiropractor who thinks that you know your body better than I do.  I am a chiropractor who will find the source of the injury, not the symptom of the injury.  I am a chiropractor who will do my best to find a clear diagnosis and give you a careful explanation.  I am a doctor.

I do think that the chiropractic profession needs to do a better job of communicating to the public, so that patients can select a chiropractor that can best meet their needs.  I do not like that there is a great divide within our profession, leading to confusion surrounding what we can do.  I am a chiropractor who believes in a broad scope of practice.  I am a chiropractor who keeps taking courses to broaden my knowledge and abilities.  I am a chiropractor who thinks that chiropractic is not the answer for everything.

I am a chiropractor. 

Promote Healing and Recovery Using a Foam Roller

A hot topic in today’s rehabilitation world is “rolling.” There are lots of products out there all designed with the same goal in mind, to loosen tight muscles. But what exactly does rolling do? How does it help muscles and tissues recover?

A 1.5hr recovery session where you will learn how to use myofascial release ‘rolling’
to recover more quickly, gain flexibility and increase aerobic capacity.

Like massage, rolling can soothe sore muscles, increase local circulation and loosen muscle spasms and adhesions. Rolling can also help release metabolic waste products and toxins that become trapped in the connective tissue as a result of exercise. Rolling can affect the Golgi Tendon Organs (GTO), which allows the muscle to relax.Foam rolling may induce some touch-induced analgesia (the feel good/better sensation) and may induce some mild tissue injury in order to stimulate healing of that tissue. At this point, scientific evidence to back up foam rolling is scarce, but the anecdotal evidence is pretty convincing. Expansion of the theories regarding benefits of other soft tissue treatment techniques, such as those supporting Active Release Techniques (ART), massage therapy and others, support the process of foam rolling.

A common question, is when should rolling occur?There is no right answer to this question. It’s typically guided by when the athlete feels best doing it, and when they respond best to doing it. Rolling can be used as part of the athlete’s warm up to help increase local circulation to the muscle, but also to activate the nervous system. Some athletes feel more comfortable doing their rolling combined with light stretching after training, which can facilitate blood flow to the area and encourage the removal of metabolites or by-products of exercise that can be damaging to the muscle.

The best way to tell if the rolling is in the right area is if the area is a little sore when you are rolling. This doesn’t mean find the areas of searing pain, which can be a nerve or blood vessel, since those structures can be damaged or injured with too much pressure.

Rolling is best done in the direction of the muscle and the pressure should be uncomfortable, but not too painful. It is beneficial to hold the pressure lightly in one spot when a sensitive area is found. Foam Tolling should never cause bruising. You should feel better, not worse, after a foam rolling session.

  • Recently injured areas
  • Circulatory problems such as diabetes
  • Chronic pain conditions
  • Bony prominences/joints

Despite what many people think, foam rolling is not comparable with myofascial release. This is a common claim of some of the tools used for rolling, but it is not true. Myofascial release requires movement of the actual tissues in order to break down the fibrosis that has developed between the muscle layers. Any technique where the load contact glides over skin cannot achieve this.Don’t use the rolling in place of an actual certified therapist, but instead use rolling as an adjunct to help your therapist keep your body in action and injury free.

Dr. Jenn Turner.

Foam Rolling Workshop at Movéo this Saturday!

Movéo is hosting a Roll, Recover, Regenerate workshop on Saturday 20th October to teach correct foam rolling technique. Ceilidh Beck will take participants through a 90 minute session training you on rolling techniques and flexibility exercises. Click here for more information about the workshop, and Book Your Spot Today by calling us at 604.984.8731.

How Acupuncture Can Reduce Injury and Promote Recovery in Sport

What is Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is part of a larger health care system known as Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM for short, that works by encouraging the body to heal itself. Studies have shown that acupuncture releases a number of hormones including endorphins, serotonin, and neuropeptides/neurotransmitters that aid in pain relief and relaxation.

How can Acupuncture help acute injuries?

Sprains and strains are some of the most common sports related injuries. Besides pain, the typical inflammatory response may include swelling, redness or bruising, and reduced range of motion. In addition to conventional R.I.C.E (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) treatment, acupuncture can be very helpful in reducing inflammation and swelling, expediting recovery by increasing local microcirculation, and attracting white blood cells to the area, both of which speed the rate of healing.

How can Acupuncture aid in recovery?

There are a growing number of athletes and recreational enthusiasts who are using acupuncture as means to recover faster and finding it to be the “cure” for everything from pain and fatigue to performance anxiety and depression all in the twirl of a few tiny needles.

By improving the circulation of blood, acupuncture can assist in the clearing of lactic acid thereby boosting recovery times. Also, acupuncture has a beneficial effect on the nervous system, and naturally boots endorphins producing a more relaxed, focused, and happy athlete. Because acupuncture works naturally with the body’s systems, there is never any fear either of testing positive in drug screening at competitive levels of sport.

Acupuncture is a common method of treatment among endurance athletes, both elite and age group. It’s common to see these athletes using acupuncture to combat acute injuries, chronic injuries or simply to help their recovery.

Mechanisms of Injury – TCM Perspective

Acute injuries from the TCM medical perspective, like in its Western counterpart happen suddenly. These injuries involve disruption in the flow of the qi, blood and body fluids, within the channels and zang/fu organs. Depending on the mechanism of injury, one pattern may dominate over the other, but most commonly present as co-occurring qi and blood stagnation (qi stagnation = swelling, blood stagnation = bruising).

Chronic injuries on the other hand, can take place over a period of time (ex: overuse injuries, improper healing of an acute injury). Because TCM is a holistic based practice, its focus is on what factors may predispose an individual to a particular condition (living environment, diet, weather etc). Most often, chronic injuries are leftover deficiencies of a previous injury that need to be nourished and corrected for complete recovery (ex: qi deficiency, blood deficiency, dampness (bi) in the joints/collaterals/meridians). Chronic injuries take longer to rectify.

TCM has a unique view of how the body functions, and within its philosophy, all systems are broken down into categories of zang/fu organ function, direction, flavour, colour, emotion, element etc.

For example: Tendons are related to the liver according to the Five Element theory of TCM. The liver has many functions according to TCM, one of which being to supply blood to all parts of the body, and ensure that the qi flows appropriately. When an athlete’s intensity increases with training, the liver energy is stressed to accommodate this increase in demand for blood. Unless appropriately nourished and supported, its function will be impaired resulting in blood deficiency or other qi mechanism problems. What ensues often are the signs and symptoms related to that of tendinopathy. Additionally, frustration and anger are signs and symptoms of a liver out of balance and for those in high-stress jobs who use athletics to smooth out their days, may find they are more prone to tendon issues as the liver is already ‘stressed’ out.

Muscles on the other hand are related to the spleen according to the Five Element Theory. The spleen’s basic functions are transporting and transforming nutrients, and producing blood (generating qi and blood). Another aspect unique to the spleen is that it “rules” the extremities making the spleen (and stomach) extremely important to the health of those participating in sports. Injury to the spleen’s energy results in digestive imbalances and/or sensitivities, fatigue, bloating and muscular weakness. Furthermore, when the spleen becomes impaired or obstructed, the muscles risk mal-nourishment resulting in frequent tears, or ongoing tightness, stiffness and/or general malaise (as often seen in overtraining syndromes).

Regardless of your current state of health or injury, acupuncture and TCM are safe and effective therapies that can help to restore balance and speed your recovery – getting you back on track faster.

Learn more about TCM

To learn more about TCM and Acupuncture, or to book an appointment, please contact Dr. Kim Graham at Moveo Sport & Rehabilitation Centre 604.984.8731

Other therapies often used in the treatment of sports injury include Cupping, Tui Na (Chinese Medical Massage), Electro-Acupuncture, Motor-Point Therapy and Self-Administered Acupressure.

Dr Jenn Turner Selected as Finalist in the 2012 Business Excellence Awards!

Dr Jenn Turner, Finalist in the North Vancouver Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards

Jenn and the Staff at Moveo would like to thank the North Vancouver Chamber of Commerce for recognizing Dr. Jenn Turner as a finalist in the 2012 Business Excellence Awards! Jenn has been selected as one of three finalists in the prestigious “Business Person of the Year” Category. The finalists for each category were announced at reception last week held at Pinnacle Hotel at the Pier.

The winners will be announced at a Gala, on November 8th, 2012. We are looking forward to the next stages of judging including comprising a video with Capilano University Film Students.

Meet Our New Chiropractor Dr. Lindsay Rite

 

Dr Jenn Turner and Dr Lindsay Rite Supporting Athletes at the Coho Run

Dr. Lindsay Rite is a native to the North Shore although she began her post-secondary education in the United States where she held a full scholarship as a NCAA DI soccer player.

Dr. Lindsay Rite

She continued her education at the University of British Columbia where she completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Human Kinetics, Kinesiology and Health Sciences, and attained her Doctor of Chiropractic Degree from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.

Dr. Rite continued her passion for sport not only as an athlete, but also as a coach, trainer and therapist, most recently working with the Ontario Provincial and National Soccer Teams.

Dr. Rite is trained in various manual techniques and believes strongly in providing evidence-informed, patient-centered care. She is excited to be back on the North Shore as part of the Movéo team and is looking forward to helping you achieve your goals.